• Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Archives
    Archives Contains a list of blog posts that were created previously.
Recent blog posts

Washington, D.C. – The U.S. Supreme Court today announced it will hear a case brought by the Gloucester County School Board in Virginia that adopted a discriminatory restroom policy that segregates transgender students from their peers and bars high school senior Gavin Grimm from using the restroom that matches his gender.

In response, the American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU of North Carolina, and Lambda Legal, the LGBT advocates challenging North Carolina’s House Bill 2 (H.B. 2), the state law that bans transgender people from the restrooms that match their gender, released the following statement:

“We are hopeful that the Supreme Court will affirm the sound decision from the Fourth Circuit and recognize the profound harms from rules that ban transgender individuals from using the restroom. For Gavin and other transgender students who are barred from using appropriate restrooms, every day these exclusionary and discriminatory policies are in place is extremely harmful. We will continue to fight H.B. 2 on behalf of transgender people across North Carolina.”


Legal groups seek reversal of lower court ruling that left most transgender North Carolinians vulnerable

RICHMOND – LGBT rights groups challenging the North Carolina law that bans transgender people from using restrooms that correspond to their gender identity yesterday filed their opening brief on appeal requesting that the preliminary injunction in the case be broadened to protect all transgender people in the state from discrimination. In August, a district court issued a preliminary injunction preventing the North Carolina university system from enforcing H.B. 2 against the three individual transgender plaintiffs in the lawsuit Carcaño v. McCrory, which is scheduled for trial in May 2017. The advocates also asked the Fourth Circuit to expedite the appeal and schedule oral argument for January.

“Every day that H.B. 2 singles out transgender North Carolinians – whether at school, at work, or just moving through their daily lives – is another day that the transgender community is told that they are second class,” said Chris Brook, ACLU of North Carolina legal director. “Though the district court recognized the serious harm to three of our clients at UNC as a result of H.B. 2, that recognition unfortunately didn’t extend to the harms that law inflicts on other transgender individuals in public buildings across North Carolina. We hope and expect that the Fourth Circuit will expand this ruling to protect all transgender people.”

The appeal filed today argues that H.B. 2 violates the Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause because it specifically targets transgender people, and that discrimination against transgender people is a form of sex discrimination. While North Carolina has argued that H.B. 2 advances interests in public safety and privacy, Lambda Legal and the ACLU argue that these interests, which can be protected in other ways, do not justify the harms H.B. 2 imposes on transgender people and that to restore the status quo, the court must grant a broader preliminary injunction while the case proceeds to trial.


The ACLU and other groups have fought hard to ensure that every eligible voter in North Carolina is able to vote. It is more important than ever that you cast a ballot and make your voice heard.

Follow these five quick tips to make sure your vote is counted this November:

  • Get registered at your current address. Check your voter registration status by visiting the North Carolina State Board of Elections website or calling 866-522-4723. The regular deadline to register is Friday, October 14. You will also have an opportunity to register during early voting beginning October 20. NOTE: In response to Hurricane Matthew, the State Board of Elections has announced that applications with October 14 or an earlier date next to the signature will be accepted if they are received on or before Wednesday, Oct. 19. Read the SBOE memo for more details.
  • Same-day registration in effect. You will also be able to register, or update your registration, at polling locations during early voting hours. Note: You cannot register to vote at the polls on Election Day, Tuesday, November 8.
  • No ID required. North Carolina's unconstitutional voter ID requirement was struck down by the courts. Most people do not need ID to vote. Visit NCvoter.org for more details.
  • Be informed. See how your state representatives voted on civil liberties by reviewing our 2016 Legislative Report Card.
  • Vote early. Early voting runs from Thursday, October 20, to Saturday, November 5. Locate your polling place and note the hours of operation by calling the state Board of Elections or visiting their website.

Election Day is Tuesday, November 8. Make sure that politicians hear your voice loud and clear this year by taking the time to register and vote.


RALEIGH – A legislative report card released today by the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina (ACLU-NC) shows that during its 2015-2016 session, the North Carolina General Assembly passed or considered a wide range of bills that diminished legal rights and civil liberties for many who call North Carolina home, especially LGBTQ people, women, immigrants, victims of police abuse, and criminal defendants.

The report card grades North Carolina House representatives on their votes on six bills introduced in the 2015-2016 session and members of the state Senate on eight. All were opposed by the ACLU-NC because of their negative impact on civil liberties.

Many of those measures were signed into law by Governor Pat McCrory, including laws that