Upcoming Events

On Display: "ACLU of North Carolina: Fifty Years of Protecting Liberty"
Date: Now through Nov. 30
Location: Chapel Hill

UNCA Chapter: Free Film Screening
Date: October 29
Location: Asheville

Wake County Chapter: W. W. Finlator Awards
Date: November 10
Location: Raleigh

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Recent blog posts

by Chris Brook, Legal Director, ACLU of North Carolina

Local government meetings are a vital part of American democracy. Unlike the U.S. Congress and most state legislatures, town council and county commission meetings commonly allow space for local residents to stand before their elected officials and others in attendance to make public comments on the issues of the day.  It’s an opportunity provided equally to all citizens. Rowan County, North Carolina, is no exception to this practice.

However, in recent years, the Rowan County Commissioners have conducted their public meetings in a way that has not only made many residents feel unwelcome and unequal but has also coerced those in attendance to take part in prayers that do not comport with their personal religious beliefs.


One Year After Marriage Equality in NC

Posted on in LGBT Rights

One year ago today, same-sex couples in North Carolina won the freedom to marry the person they love.

Many people contributed to that incredible victory. But the most important of all were the families who had the courage and conviction to serve as plaintiffs in the legal challenges the ACLU and others brought against North Carolina's discriminatory marriage ban.

Please join us in thanking the families who served as plaintiffs in our marriage lawsuits and helped expand freedom and equality for thousands of North Carolinians.


By Mike Meno, ACLU-NC Communications Director

The U.S. Department of Justice announced Friday that it would appeal a judge’s decision to dismiss charges of discriminatory profiling and other civil rights abuses filed against Alamance County Sheriff Terry Johnson (pictured).

A 2012 lawsuit brought by the federal government charged that under Johnson’s command, the Alamance County Sheriff’s Office systematically and unlawfully targeted Latino residents for investigation, traffic stops, arrests, seizures, and other enforcement actions. During the trial held earlier this year, experts testified that Johnson’s deputies were approximately 4, 9, and 10 times more likely, respectively, to stop Latino drivers than similarly situated non-Latino drivers along three major Alamance County highways.


Victory Protecting Local LGBT Nondiscrimination Laws

Posted on in LGBT Rights

Earlier this week, under cover of night, and less than 48 hours away from the close of the nine month legislative session, members of the General Assembly attempted—once again—to sanction discrimination against LGBT North Carolinians.  A provision negotiated in secret by a group of appointed House and Senate members was inserted into SB 279, an unrelated bill on licensing requirements for counselors, and would have stripped local governments of their ability to pass ordinances protecting LGBT residents from discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations.  In the waning hours of the legislative session, the ACLU and our allies worked tirelessly to educate both members of the General Assembly and the public about the devastating discriminatory consequences of such a law.  A broad coalition that included civil rights groups, faith leaders, and local governments came together to stand up and fight—and today, we’re proud to tell you that we won!

The discriminatory provision was removed from the bill just after midnight last night sending the message loud and clear that the General Assembly has no business interfering in local decisions to enact anti-discrimination policies. To date, many communities across North Carolina—including  Buncombe, Durham, Mecklenburg, and Wake counties, and the cities of Asheville, Boone, Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Charlotte, High Point and Raleigh—have passed ordinances protecting LGBT residents from discrimination, with popular local support.  Wake County is the newest addition to this list, having just amended its employee non-discrimination provisions to include LGBT protections earlier this month.  We supported that effort, and will continue to support local efforts while pushing for statewide protections as well.

We must all remain vigilant in the face of any future attempts to codify intolerance, but today, we hope you join us in celebrating this victory!